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14547 62nd Street
Oskaloosa, KS, 66066
United States

7852208363

 

Founded in 2002, Homestead Ranch, has sought to bring the ideals of sustainable farming to reality.  It is our goal to provide for our family without a deep impact on the environment.   

  This is the core of sustainable. 

We use everything we produce to make our products wholesome and handcrafted so we may nurture the dynamic biosphere in which we reside. It is important to know what we put in and on our bodies from start to finish and we strive to give that to our customers. 

We deeply believe that knowing the source matters.

 

Founded in 2002, Homestead Ranch, has sought to bring the ideals of sustainable farming to reality.  It is our goal to provide for our family without a deep impact on the environment. This, to us, is the core of sustainable.  We use everything we produce to make our products wholesome and handcrafted so we may nurture the animals and environment in which we reside. It is important for us to know what we put in and on our bodies from start to finish and we strive to give that to our customers.  We deeply believe that knowing the source matters.

What We are up to

Swimming with Radishes

courtney skeeba

Rub-a-dub-dub we've got radishes to scrub...

The refrain of mid to late May. 

They have gone swimming,

been bathed in the sink,

rubbed and scrubbed into whites, reds, purples and pinks. 

Bunched and bundled,

taken for rides,

sold at market,

eaten fresh, pickled and fried.

 

(Well, not really fried--sauteed but it didn't rhyme with rides. Feeling a little on the silly side today. Yes, they are really tasty sauteed in butter, crispy, radishy but without the bite.  Pickled is a taste sensation especially in a salad or on a sandwich. Want some recipes? Ask and you shall receive)

Seedlings and Schematics

courtney skeeba

Pop, pop, pop...  Here they are the first of the brassicas making their appearance.  Cauliflower and broccoli to be more transparent.  The smell of fresh dirt is thick in the entryway of our home, my makeshift greenhouse, made possible with the patience of my wife and my son's skills at serial wiring(well he is getting there with some gentle guidence).  We have trees in the living room and little plant pots everywhere.  Even the asparagus seed I planted are peeking out of the soil(that was a long wait). Spring is creeping in. 

Oops, the tiller.... A fall project long forgotten and scantly remembered.  I managed to break the throttle arm mid summer and had been meaning to fix that.  Right.  Needless to say, on this warm day it sounds like a job to tackle in eager anticipation of the coming season.  Just as a precaution I had better rig it up and give her a pull.  Sputter, spit, cough, ugh, fire not.  Try as I might it won't idle and is giving me the nnn-nn-nnn of a sticky carburetor not to mention the smell of the gasoline dripping out of the now burst fuel line.  At least I checked it out earlyish.  So parts manual and schematics in hand the tear down begins in earnest.  I do so love to study the exploded view of things; a childhood obsession with tearing things down and building them back up again that has never left me.  Gas tank off, throttle disassembled, carburetor torn down, belts checked, tines cleaned, oil changed, tires aired, spark plug out, parts list and numbers in hand, the order is made.  Now can we put Humpty Dumpty back together again?  Just need to wait on the parts.  Feels like this pot will never boil. 

Down the Rabbit Hole and Other Magic Tricks

courtney skeeba

"Why, oh why, didn't I take the blue pill?"...  Well, the rabbit hole is more interesting. Simple enough.  The month of February is nearly gone and the dark warmth of the warren is beginning to melt into the sunny inklings of nature's promise of warmer days.  The fluctuations of winter in Kansas have shown us snow, sleet, ice, rain, freezing and near 70 degree days, just in the last week.  It is a wonder to survive within this vast array of climate extremes, to be certain.  Productivity waxes and wanes as phases of the moon govern ebb and flow.   The tide of March is rolling in with certain force and we surf toward the shore of its spring. 

The past weeks I have engulfed myself in the care and nurturing of a sourdough baby, trying to comprehend the ins and outs of a (bargain buy) antique knitting machine, building up a stock of hand knits, seed starting for the coming season, homeschooling with a vengeance, prepping the young padawan to test for his black belt, helping with his uptake in fencing and, without question, the tending of our flock of miscreant of goats, chickens, rabbits, dogs and cats.  The magic trick in this hustle of becoming proficient in bread making, knitting, growing, schooling, learning, helping and tending is remembering to sit in stillness, at least for a moment, to breathe in the wonder of all this has to offer and appreciate the quiet of winter...